Back to March 2020

Letter from the Publisher: A Fireside Chat

To kick off the 53rd Volume of Pecan South, our publisher writes a letter our readers.


Dear Readers,

We decided to change up the opening letter, or fireside chat if you will, for the first issue of Volume 53. I am the Publisher for Pecan South, handling the business of the magazine and ultimately responsible for the magazine’s publication each month. I hope I have gotten to meet a good majority of you, but if not, I hope we will meet at this next round of industry conferences. You can find a list of those conferences on the left side of this page each month.

I have been fortunate to have worked in the pecan industry and with Pecan South for over 15 years. Frequent conversations with those in the industry and traveling to many areas of the pecan world have granted me many learning opportunities, and for that, I will always be thankful. Working for Pecan South comes with the privilege of being a sounding board for the industry, and that is something I do not take for granted. However, being an observer and voice for the industry is not without its obligations.

The industry has seen expansion both domestically and internationally, which you will see weaved into the threads of several articles this month, including one about the South African pecan industry and another with advice on planting new trees. With this industry development, I have seen a lot of things I am proud of, and I’m sad to say, some things I am not. To be sure, some of these are growing pains. But are we focusing too much on the pains instead of on the future?

Personally, I do not want to look back and say we could have done better as an industry. Our office archives provide a window into past successes and failures, and I hope to look back at this time and see more successes than anything. Sure, we are going to disagree, but let’s remember to look outward when choosing an opponent. Think about all we are up against in agriculture. Do we need another adversary, especially one within the pecan family?

It is times like these when I think about my grandfather. He lived to be 93 years old and saw a lot of change in his lifetime. When something new came about, he believed in listening and educating himself, instead of making choices from unfounded reactions. I am a product of his teaching and hope I can still learn from his lessons on decision-making and his love of pecans. For it is with him that I had my first insights into agriculture and the wonderful product we represent—pecans. He might have bought out all of the pecans in Hays County, Texas, the year I started working in the industry, and his example of pride, poise, and support is something I hope we can emulate.

Sincerely,

Blair Krebs

Publisher